Courses

Astronomy

Prerequisite High School Coursework
  • 2 units of natural science, preferably Earth/Space Sciences, Physical Science, or Chemistry 
  • 3 units of math, successful completion of Algebra 2
  • 2 units of English

AND College Prerequisite:

  • Math 1050 or Math Placement R

Astronomy 1101 - From Planets to the Cosmos

From Planets to the Cosmos (Astronomy 1101) is an overview of astronomy from our solar system to the universe as a whole for non-science majors. The course is organized around three overarching and interconnected themes:

  1. The Long Copernican Revolution - The historical discovery of the nature of our solar system, and our on-going discovery of planetary systems around other stars.
  2. The Lives of Stars - The nature and evolution of stars and stellar remnants (white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes), and the origin of the chemical elements we find in nature.
  3. The Cosmos - The history of galaxies and the universe, evidence for the Big Bang, the structure of the universe on its largest scales, and our current ideas   on the origin and ultimate fate of our universe.

This course will review a number of the facts that astronomers have learned about thesetopics, describe the outstanding scientific problems at the frontiers of current research,illustrate ways in which physical principles are used to understand the universe, and show how scientific theories are developed and tested against observations.

Why Take This Course

Students will gain a comprehensive overview of modern astronomy and the big questionsthat motivate much of current astronomical research. Among the questions students should be able to answer by the end of the course are the following:

  • What is the architecture of our solar system, and how do we find other planetary systems?
  • What is a star, and how do they form, evolve, and end their lives?
  • What is a galaxy?
  • What is the evidence for dark matter and dark energy?
  • What is the Big Bang?
  • What empirical evidence supports and/or challenges our explanations for the physical nature of stars, galaxies, and the cosmos?
Course Requirements

This course is taught 100% online, so the student will need a computer with high-speed internet access, specifically a current-generation Windows or Mac computer with a Firefox web browser, Microsoft Office, and Adobe Reader installed. Experience preparing documents in Adobe PDF format will be necessary for turning in written assignments, and familiarity with classroom management systems is essential. Students will use the OSU Carmen classroom management system for nearly all aspects of this course.

Students will also need to purchase a copy of the Starry Night College edition planetarium software, available at a cost of $29.95 for a 1-year license. Half of the online lab exercises for this course will use Starry Night extensively.  It requires a compatible Windows or Mac computer (it is not available for iPad, Android, or Surface tablets, with minimum memory and display requirements.

The workload for this course is as follows:

  • 3 online lecture videos and associated readings per week  
  • 1 online exploratory lab exercise per week  
  • 1 5-week moon observing lab during towards the start of the semester  
  • 1 short online assessment per week  
  • 1 discussions/participation exercise per week  
  • 2 exams taken at the ends of Units 1 and 2  
  • 1 comprehensive final exam
Required Textbook

None

Biology

Prerequisite High School Coursework

None. Background knowledge consistent with the standards established for high school science by the Ohio Department of Education will be required.

Biology 1102 - Human Biology

In Biology 1102, non-major Biology students gain an understanding of basic human biology. Topics will include evolution, genetics, nutrition, reproduction, organ function and development, hormones, and infectious, genetic and immune diseases. Current interactions of science, technology and society are noted and discussed throughout the course. Assignments give students opportunities to personally consider these interactions. Biology 1102 is designed to help students make informed decisions about their own biology, human society and biology-based technological advances that they will encounter during their 21st century lives.

Why Take This Course

Issues related to human biology, behavior, and healthcare are routinely in the news and topics of TV and talk radio discussions. Oftentimes, the scientific facts provided are minimal, whereas the extrapolations are extensive. The goal of Biology 1102 is to provide students with baseline knowledge of human biology, and to help identify current limits of knowledge related to human biology issues and 21st century human behavior and lifestyles. During the course, students will participate in a project focusing on a disease of their choice. Students will become experts on a particular disease, and will apply their knowledge of body systems to their understanding of that disease. Students will then view presentations from their peers on a suite of diseases affecting all body systems covered in the course.

As scientifically literate citizens, successful students will be able to:

  1. Find and evaluate sources of information related to human biology and critique claims based on quality of scientific evidence.
  2. Apply knowledge of human anatomy and physiology of each of the body systems to explain human health or disease.
  3. Apply knowledge of genetics, reproduction and development, and the environment to explain human health or disease.
  4. Apply knowledge of evolution to explain human health or disease.
  5. Explain the relevance of biology to their lives.
  6. Evaluate current and historical scientific and technological developments as they relate to social and philosophical aspects of human biology.
Course Requirements

Internet Access Required.

Your access to Canvas is an integral and necessary part of this course. You must activate your OSU email account to have access to Canvas. 

Required Textbook

Human Biology: Concepts and Current Issues

  • Author: Johnson, Michael
  • Edition: Custom 7th Edition
  • Publication Date: January 19, 2013
  • ISBN: 132351080X

Includes access to Mastering Biology.

Prerequisite High School Coursework
  • 2 units of natural science, preferably Biology and Chemistry
  • 3 units of math, successful completion of Algebra 2
  • At least 2 units of English

Biology 1350 - The Biology of Hope and Belief

The underlying premise of this course is that the human mind and human behaviors have been shaped by the force of natural selection. That is, we are not born as blank slates waiting to be shaped by the environment and experience. Rather, we come into the world with predispositions, preferences and passions that evolved because they helped our ancestors survive. Some of these behaviors are complex, longstanding and present in every human culture ever studied. This course explores the biological basis for two of them: the human capacity for hope and the human desire to believe in a supernatural deity.

The course begins with an evaluation of hope; what is it and how is it different from optimism? Thereafter, we explore the nervous system, how it is structured and how it has evolved over time. Do we find evidence for hope among other species, including our closest cousin, the chimpanzee? We will look at the neurobiology of hope and how that changes when one is in a state of hopelessness. We will ask whether it is possible to cheat death with hope and what data support this contention.

From there, the course takes on an issue that is intimately related to hope, i.e., the near universal human desire to believe in God. We will examine how causality is learned in young children and from that how beliefs are formed neurologically. We will study how malleable beliefs are once they are formed, how false beliefs are created and the neurobiological events that attend the changes. Thereafter, we will examine the neurobiology that underscores religious states such as reverie, mysticism and hallucination. We will learn how brain activity is studied using various types of brain scans and data from brain-injured subjects. We will evaluate data used to support different points of view about the reality of religious states.

Throughout the course, we will seek to understand how the force of natural selection might have led to both hope and religious faith. What were the selective advantages to our ancestors and what, if any, data support these contentions? The course, in short, explores the biological bases for two qualities thought to be uniquely human: our capacity for hope and our relationship to a supernatural deity.

Why Take This Course

The course will emphasize the evolution of human behavior and help explicate the biological basis for evolution as well as evidence for the evolutionary basis of hope and belief. In so doing, it will assist students with understanding the basic facts, principles, theories and methods of modern science as they relate to the biology of hope and belief.

This course will assist students in understanding that science is not static in its presentation but changes over time as new data are evaluated and incorporated into the scientific canon. To accomplish this, students will study the development of scientific thought underpinning the biology of hope and belief over time so that students will understand that science is an evolving body of knowledge.

Also important to becoming a citizen in the modern world in which scientific discoveries are a part of everyday life is to be able to understand the relationship between science and technology. This course will make those connections explicit as they relate to hope and belief.

In modern society, it is imperative for students to be able to recognize the social and philosophical implications of scientific discoveries on our society. There is no more fertile ground upon which to make these connections than an exploration of the biology of hope andbelief.

This course meets the natural science requirement for the BA at the Ohio State University. It is offered in a 100% online format during summer and fall semesters.

Course Requirements

Because this course is taught 100% online, it is essential to have a computer with high-speed Internet access.  Without a good computer with reliable Internet access, this course will not be possible. In addition, it is helpful to have had previous experience with classroom management systems. The students will be responsible for acquiring the necessary facility with OSU’s classroom management system to effectively navigate this course.

The workload of this course consists of the following:

  • 2-4 online modules/week (varies according to whether it is summer or fall semester)
  • 1 online exploratory exercise/week
  • 1 online quiz/week
  • Weekly readings from the book
  • Comprehensive final
Required Textbook

The Biology of Hope and Belief

  • Authors: Fisher, Christopher M.L. and Susan W. Fisher

Recognizing the burden that purchasing expensive textbooks creates for students, we are making this book available to enrolled students as an ebook free of charge.

Entomology

Prerequisite High School Coursework
  • 2 units of natural science, preferably Biology and Chemistry3
  • 3 units of math, successful completion of Algebra 2
  • At least 2 units of English

Entomology 2101 - Pests, Plagues, Pollinators and Potions: Insects and Human Affairs

Insects have invaded every environment imaginable from the binding of books to human skin.  Thus, insects are a daily fact of life and have exerted considerable influence on human affairs over the course of history.  This course analyzes the extensive and sometimes uncomfortable relationship between insects and humans, including historical roots of insect/human interactions both positive and negative, impact of insects on development of scientific thought and use of insects as experimental models in drug design and military applications.

1.  Basic Insect Anatomy and Physiology

The course is divided into four parts. In the first part, the goal is to provide enough information about insect anatomy, physiology and ecology so that students will be comfortable to allusions to these ideas as we progress through the course.   For those who face the prospect of learning any biology let alone insect biology with trepidation:  fear not.  Working from the premise that “we’re not that different,” all of these chapters are designed to compare insect processes to cognate processes in humans.  Since most nonscientists have at least a basic grasp of the essentials in humans, experience shows that this is a fairly painless way of creating awareness of how insect systems work.

2.  Insects and Aesthetics

This section  of the course examines the importance of insects to mankind as revealed in the multiplicity of ways that humans have used insects to explain how the natural world works (primarily mythology, fables and religion) and as sources of creative inspiration (art, music poetry, literature). Students will be challenged to consider WHY insects assume these roles in human culture and what it reveals about human nature and psychology.

3.  Insects as Agents of Historical Change

This phrase is a euphemism for what would otherwise be termed “the many, many problems” caused by insects for humans.  The reality is that insect depredation of food sources and insect borne diseases have caused devastation on a global scale throughout recorded history.  The goal of this part of the course is to learn how even so lowly an insect as the common rat flea can wreak havoc on an unimaginable scale.  We ponder the resulting influences on the human psyche and whether such episodes could recur in modern times.

4. Insects Working for Us

The goal of this section of the course is encourage a holistic understanding of insects by teaching that, despite the difficulties that insects can cause, there are many instances in which insects provide demonstrable benefits to mankind.  Several examples revolve around the ecological roles of insects (as a food source and as recyclers of organic debris).  In addition, insect activity underlies powerful economic forces, e.g., as providers of pollination services, as the basis for therapeutic drugs and as producers of valuable commodities such as silk and honey.  Finally, research performed on and with insects has been pivotal in establishing the foundational theories of modern science, e.g., the Germ Theory of Disease and the Modern Synthesis.

Why Take This Course

Students will gain a comprehensive understanding of the basic facts, principles, theories and methods of modern science as they relate to humans and insects.

Students understand key events in the development of science and recognize that science is an evolving body of knowledge.

Students will be able to describe the inter-dependence of scientific and technological developments.

Students will recognize social and philosophical implications of scientific discoveries that involve insects and understand the potential of science and technology to address problems of the contemporary world.

The course will help students connect the dots between scientific ideas and the impact they have on human beings.

This course meets the natural science requirement for the BA at The Ohio State University.  It is offered in a 100% format during summer and spring semesters.

Course Requirements

Because this course is taught 100% online, it is essential to have a computer with high-speed Internet access.  Without a good computer with reliable Internet access, this course will not be possible.  In addition, it is helpful to have had previous experience with classroom management systems.  The students will be responsible for acquiring the necessary facility with OSU’s classroom management system to effectively navigate this course.

The workload of this course consists of the following:

  • 2-4 on-line modules/week (varies according to whether it is summer or spring semester)
  • 1 on-line exploratory exercise/week
  • 1 on-line quiz/week
  • Weekly readings from the book
  • Comprehensive final
Required Textbook

Pests, Plagues, Pollinators and Potions:  Insects and Human Affairs

  • Authors: Fisher, Susan W. and Wendy Klooster

Recognizing the burden that purchasing expensive textbooks creates for students, we are making this book available to enrolled students as an ebook free of charge.

Environmental & Natural Resources

Prerequisite High School Coursework
  • 2 units of natural science – preferably Chemistry and Biology
  • 3 units of math – Successful Completion of Algebra 2
  • at least 2 units of English (3 preferred)

Environmental & Natural Resources 2100 – Introduction to Environmental Science

Introduction to Environmental Science (ENR2100) explores the ecological foundation of environmental systems, the impacts of environmental degradation by humans, and strategies for sustainable management of environmental and natural resources. The course teaches environmental literacy, scientific literacy and the scientific process.  

Topics that will be examined in class include: agriculture, air pollution, alternative and renewable energy, biodiversity, climate change, community ecology, consumption, Earth’s climates and biomes, energy and ecosystems, evolution, food production, fossil fuels, freshwater resources, hazardous wastes, human population growth, mass production, persistent pollutants, population ecology, protecting Earth’s resources, sustainability, urbanization, and water pollution. 

Essential questions explored in class: What are the main environmental concerns facing Earth? How have and do humans contribute to changes in environmental and ecological systems? How can human actions contribute to the sustainable management of the environment and Earth’s natural resources? How do scientists study complex environmental systems? What are the connections between the abiotic and biotic components of Earth? How did life evolve in our universe and where is it headed?

Students completing ENR2100 gain the following skills: Develop new interests and values centered on local and global ecological challenges and sustainability. Develop skills to effectively communicate scientific research to others. Learn about highly respected primary and secondary sources so that they become familiar with these resources and use them as a resource in the future. Learn about our environmental footprint, how our footprint compares to other countries around the world and how to lessen our negative impact on the environment. Learn how the peer review process is essential to science. Learn about sustainable lifestyles for humans. Evaluate everyday human actions and assess the impact on the environment. Understand the interconnected character of natural processes and impact that humans can have on ecological systems. 

Why Take This Course

Students will gain a comprehensive understanding of how their daily lives impact other living organisms and learn about sustainable ways to protect the health of our planet.

Students will learn about different types and sources of air and water pollution and the health affects associated with these toxins for humans and other organisms.

Students will learn how to find and understand highly-respected sources of scientific information (e.g., journals, governmental organizations), which they can use in the to make well-informed decisions about the way they live.   

This course provides a strong foundation in environmental science, which is necessary for students interested in future careers in science, engineering and natural resources. It is also a cornerstone for students wishing to pursue advanced degrees in graduate school.      

The class is a requirement for all the majors and minors offered by the School of Environment and Natural Resources at The Ohio State University.  

The Ohio State University requires that all students complete a minimum of 10 semester hours of General Education (GE) science courses, including at least one biological science course. ENR2100 fulfills this requirement because it is a 3-credit hour GE course in the Natural Sciences, Biological Sciences category. 

Course Requirements

Requirements include a computer with high-speed Internet access. Read journal articles and newspaper articles that are free of charge. Read assigned chapters in our textbook. Watch instructor-produced closed captioned video lectures on YouTube that are free of charge. Watch externally produced multimedia that is free of charge. Check understanding through ungraded assessment quizzes. Complete reflective assignments utilizing short answer or open ended questions. Design, write and present either a short-format article or scientific poster. Take one midterm exam, one final exam and weekly quizzes that utilize multiple-choice questions. These exams and quizzes require the student to apply knowledge and concepts that are learned in class.  

Course learning outcomes include: Identify and recognize the basic facts, principles, theories, and methods of modern science. Review key events in the development of science and recognize that science is an evolving body of knowledge. Describe the inter-dependence of scientific and technological developments.  Recognize social and philosophical implications of scientific discoveries and demonstrate understanding of the potential of science and technology to address problems of the contemporary world.

Required Textbook

We recommend that the students purchase our textbook, but its NOT required.  

If the students learn best by reading chapters from a textbook, then they will want to purchase the textbook.  If they learn best by watching and listening to our class lectures/videos and take good notes from the lectures then they will NOT need the textbook.

Scientific American Environmental Science for a Changing World

  • Authors: Anne Houtman, Susan Karr, Jeneen InterlandI
  • Edition: 1st or 2nd edition (both are acceptable)
  • Publisher: W. H. Freeman

Educational Psychology

Prerequisite High School Coursework

None

ES EPSY 1159 - Online Learning Strategies and Skills

This 2-credit, 7-week elective course is devoted to exploring how to use the web for a successful college experience. The course covers navigating academic web resources and services, using online tools for time management and organization, developing strategies for online learning, communicating online, searching for academic content, and evaluating the credibility and usefulness of online resources. The course takes place wholly online and is offered autumn, spring, and summer.

Why Take This Course

This course is designed for any student wishing to maximize efficiency and effectiveness when using technology in college classes. By completing the course activities and assignments, students will be able to do the following:

  • Apply strategies for effective learning and motivation in online settings.
  • Demonstrate information literacy by selecting and evaluating online tools and resources that support your academic goals.
  • Utilize learning technologies to improve engagement and time management in college classes.
Course Requirements

The course has seven weekly online modules. For each module, students will read a selection from the textbook, view an online presentation and videos, and complete 3-4 online assignments such as application/practice activities, collaborative discussions, and reflective blog posts.

Required Textbook

e-Learning Companion: A Student’s Guide to Online Success

  • Author: Watkins & Corry
  • Edition: 4th
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • ISBN: 113331631X
Prerequisite High School Coursework

None

ES EPSY 1259 - Learning and Motivation: Strategies for Success in College

This 3-credit, full-semester, elective course provides a comprehensive overview of the academic beliefs and behaviors essential to success in college. Students will become strategic learners in the college environment by developing insights into how, when, and why to use different types of learning and motivation strategies. Topics covered include: motivation, goal setting, time management, memory and learning, improving concentration, taking lecture notes, reading textbooks, preparing for exams, test taking, and communicating persuasively. Multiple sections of the course take place wholly online. On campus sections are also available. The course is offered autumn, spring, and summer.

Why Take This Course

Students will implement new strategies, receive feedback from their instructor, exchange ideas with other college students, and apply what they learn to maximize outcomes in their other college coursework. By completing the course activities and assignments, students will gain experience and understanding related to the following elements of college success:

  • Building motivation for learning
  • Overcoming procrastination and managing time
  • Boosting concentration and limiting distractions
  • Understanding memory and using memory strategies
  • Taking, editing, and reviewing lecture notes
  • Reading, marking, and organizing text information
  • Preparing for and confidently taking tests
  • Developing organized, engaging papers and speeches
Course Requirements

Each week, students will read selections from the textbook, view online presentations and videos, and complete 1-3 assignments. Assignment formats include self-assessment surveys, reflective writing, collaborative discussions, and application/practice activities.

Required Textbook

College Study Skills: Becoming a Strategic Learner

  • Author: Van Blerkom
  • Edition: 7th
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • ISBN: 0495913510

Mathematics

Prerequisite High School Coursework
  • CCP students must follow existing prerequisite and placement policies. Students will take the Math Test B or Test D, as determined by their ACT/SACT scores. Students will not be able to take the math placement test until they are admitted to the Academy program. Information about placement testing will be sent to the student once admitted. For more information, please see Math Placement Test.

  • Eligible Placement score for College Credit Plus students: L = Calculus level; students eligible to enroll in Math 1151

Math 1151 - Calculus 1

The Ohio State Math Department will offer a Flipped and Flexible Calculus class for Calculus 1: Math 1151 each autumn and spring semester.  (These courses are part of the State of Ohio Transfer Assurance Guides (TAG) Program, which means that these credits are automatically accepted for Calculus 1 and Calculus 2 in all Ohio public colleges and universities and will be highly likely to transfer to any college or university.)

This Flipped and Flexible Calculus class will be modeled after the flipped classroom approach.  This means that students will watch videos and do activities online before attending class to prepare for the days class.  Then, during class time, students will actively work on math problems, engage in discussions, and work in groups.

Students in the hybrid sections of the course have in person recitation classes. Students will have the option to attend some online through a web-based program called Carmen Connect if they need to. (This is the flexible part of the course.) Students should attend in person whenever they are able to do so. Those unable to attend in person because of a conflict (such as being on a regional campus or at a high school) can attend online regularly with permission from the lecturer. These students are encouraged to sign up for the purely online section if it fits into their schedule.  

Exams (3 midterms, 1 final) will be in-person and proctored. Students may take common evening exams at Ohio State or proctored exams at their local high school or other local test proctoring site. Ohio State regional campus students may make arrangements with their regional math learning centers to take the exams there. 

Required Textbook

Calculus for Scientists and Engineers: Early Transcendentals

  • Authors: Briggs, Cochran & Gillett
  • Edition: OSU 2nd Custom Edition

Access to MyMathLab and the online book is required. The paper book is optional.

Prerequisite High School Coursework
  • CCP students must follow existing prerequisite and placement policies. Students will take the Math Test B or Test D, as determined by their ACT/SACT scores. Students will not be able to take the math placement test until they are admitted to the Academy program. Information about placement testing will be sent to the student once admitted. For more information, please see Math Placement Test.

  • Eligible Placement score for College Credit Plus students: L = Calculus level; students eligible to enroll in Math 1152

Math 1152 - Calculus 2

The Ohio State Math Department will offer a Flipped and Flexible Calculus class for Calculus 2: Math 1152 each autumn and spring semester.  (These courses are part of the State of Ohio Transfer Assurance Guides (TAG) Program, which means that these credits are automatically accepted for Calculus 1 and Calculus 2 in all Ohio public colleges and universities and will be highly likely to transfer to any college or university.)

This Flipped and Flexible Calculus class will be modeled after the flipped classroom approach.  This means that students will watch videos and do activities online before attending class to prepare for the days class.  Then, during class time, students will actively work on math problems, engage in discussions, and work in groups.

Students in the hybrid sections of the course have in person recitation classes. Students will have the option to attend some online through a web-based program called Carmen Connect if they need to. (This is the flexible part of the course.) Students should attend in person whenever they are able to do so. Those unable to attend in person because of a conflict (such as being on a regional campus or at a high school) can attend online regularly with permission from the lecturer.  These students are encouraged to sign up for the purely online section if it fits into their schedule.  

Exams (3 midterms, 1 final) will be in-person and proctored. Students may take common evening exams at Ohio State or proctored exams at their local high school or other local test proctoring site. Ohio State regional campus students may make arrangements with their regional math learning centers to take the exams there. 

Required Textbook

Calculus for Scientists and Engineers: Early Transcendentals

  • Authors: Briggs, Cochran & Gillett
  • Edition: OSU 2nd Custom Edition

Access to MyMathLab and the online book is required. The paper book is optional.

Political Science

Prerequisite High School Coursework
  • US and world history courses
  • 2 units of English (3 units of English would be beneficial)

Political Science 1100 - Introduction to American Politics

This course is an introduction to the institutions, processes, and influences of American government, politics, and political behavior. The first part of the course will focus on political elites, discussing the history and theories of American democracy, as well as its political institutions (Congress, Executive, and Judiciary). The second half of the course will shift gears and focus on mass political behavior and interests (public opinion, contemporary political debates, voting and campaigns and elections).

Required Textbook

Central Ideas in American Government

  • Authors: Evans, Jocelyn and Kristy Michaud
  • Edition: 6th edition
  • Publisher: Soomo Publishing
  • ISBN: 978-0-9904165-6-2
Prerequisite High School Coursework

None

Political Science 1165 - Introduction to Politics

Are you interested in politics? The organizing principle of the study of politics is the issue of power: who has it, the struggle to get it, and the uses to which it is put. This is a class that introduces students to the ways in which different branches of political science engage this issue. In this class we will examine, for example, the causes of war and peace, the foundation of systems of economic or racial hierarchies, transitions to democracy or away from it, as well as elections, partisan competition, and protest. Our concrete examples will span the globe – from the dynamics of American politics and political institutions, to rich and poor countries abroad, to the interactions among states in the international system. Political Science 1165 serves as a required pre-major class for students interested in any of the undergraduate degrees offered by the Political Science Department. 

Prerequisite High School Coursework
  • US and world history courses
  • 2 units of English (3 units of English would be beneficial)

Political Science 1200 - Introduction to Comparative Politics

This is a course that introduces students to politics as it takes place outside the United States. The emphasis is on the big questions of the day: How should democracy be structured? How do countries confront the challenges of economic development, inequality, ethnic and racial cleavages, or nation building? What are the politics that make possible transitions from authoritarianism to democracy? And how are different authoritarian political systems structured? The class will address questions of this nature in the context of an analysis of selected wealthy and poor countries around the world.

Required Textbook

Comparative Politics: Integrating Theories, Methods, and Cases

  • Authors: Dickovick, J. Tyler and Jonathan Eastwood
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 9780195392104

OR

Introducing Comparative Politics: Concepts and Cases in Contexts

  • Authors: Carol Ann Drogus and Stephen Orvis
  • Edition: 3rd edition
Prerequisite High School Coursework
  • US and world history courses
  • 2 units of English (3 units of English would be beneficial)

Political Science 1300 - Introduction to Global Politics

What are the causes of war? What are the conditions in which people from different parts of the world can work together to tackle common problems such as climate change? This course provides you with the basic theoretical perspectives to address important issues in world politics such as these, and also covers other topics including economic relations, the role of international organizations, and human rights. At the end of the course, you will be able to critically analyze the phenomena in world politics as an informed citizen.

Required Textbook

Essentials of International Relations

  • Authors: Karen Mingst & Ivan Arreguin-Toft
  • Edition: 6th edition
  • Publisher: W.W. Norton
Prerequisite High School Coursework
  • US and world history courses
  • 2 units of English (3 units of English would be beneficial)

Political Science 2300 - American Foreign Policy

Today, the United States possesses unrivaled power and influence in international politics. How is this power used? How is U.S. foreign policy developed and implemented? What interests should the United States pursue in key policy areas like terrorism, economic globalization and weapons proliferation? The goal of this course is to equip students with the knowledge and analytical skills needed to answer these questions and to critically evaluate the role of the United States in the world.

Required Textbook

US Foreign Policy: The Paradox of World Power

  • Author: Hook, Steven W
  • Edition: 4th edition
  • Publisher: CQ Press
  • ISBN: 978-1-4522-4150-0
Prerequisite High School Coursework
  • US and world history courses
  • 2 units of English (3 units of English would be beneficial)

Political Science 2400 - Introduction to Political Theory

Justice, it is said, requires giving people what they are due – but what exactly are people due? Does justice encompass freedom and equality, or are these often conflicting political values? If so, how do we trade them off against each other? How should a just state distribute the goods that we all need, such as rights and liberties, educational opportunities, and wealth? In addition to studying great philosophical answers to such questions, we will apply those answers to live debates about pressing political questions, for example, regulating sexual conduct, economic markets, affirmative action, environmental sustainability, immigration, and global justice.

Required Textbook

Coming Soon

Psychology

Prerequisite High School Coursework
  • 3 English Units
  • 3 Math Units – Successful Completion of Algebra 2
  • Science Unit – Successful Completion of Biology​

Psychology 1100 - Introduction to Psychology

Introduction to Psychology is an overview of the discipline of psychology, including many sub-fields or areas of specialization -  more than just the study of psychological disorders. The course is organized in three broad areas:

  • Unit 1 focuses on how we study psychology and the biological basis for behavior,including the structure and function of the brain and nervous system, how oursensory systems work and allow us to perceive the world around us, consciousness and the effects of sleep and drugs.
  • Unit 2 concentrates on how the mind works, including how we learn new skills andbehaviors, how memory works and why our memory sometimes fails us, how ourcognitive and social skills change and develop over the lifespan, how and why weexperience emotions, and how the body and mind respond to stress.
  • In Unit 3, the emphasis in on topics that inform how we relate to other people,including social psychology, intelligence and personality, and psychologicaldisorders.  These topics are rich in content relevant to social diversity andappreciating our similarities and differences as individuals.

Throughout the course, content emphasizes social science (how we systematically study thesetopics and how the content can be applied to solve problems or address social issues) andsocial diversity (psychological factors that contribute to individuals’ similarities and differences,and a broader appreciation and understanding of equality).  Thus, the course satisfies OhioState’s General Education (GE) requirements for both Social Science and Social Diversity.

Why Take This Course

Although many people think of Psychology in terms of psychological disorders and mentalhealth, the course covers a much wider variety of topics of high interest to students includingthe impact of drugs and alcohol on the brain, social behavior such as conformity andpersuasion, the brain, sensation/perception and sensory illusions, and common errors andbiases in the way we process information and make decisions, to name a few.    

Much of the content covered in Introduction to Psychology is information students can put touse right away in their daily lives!  For example, students might discuss how various strategiesfor reinforcing behavior are used in consumer loyalty programs, and what study strategies aremost likely to help you succeed on that upcoming exam.

Practically speaking, Psychology 1100 is a requirement of many academic programs.Psychology is a “hub science” that informs many different disciplines.  Foundational knowledgein psychology is transferrable to many different areas of study so no matter what your majoryou are likely to find this content useful in your academic career and beyond.  

For students interested in a future career in medicine, the American Association of MedicalColleges requires foundational knowledge in Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundationsof Behavior on the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT). A majority of this foundationalcontent is included in the standard curriculum of Introduction to Psychology. 

Course Requirements

Requirements include section-specific points earned through participation in discussion forumsand online activities, research participation, and a combination of papers, projects, and assignments. Three exams (two midterms and a final) are also required. Midterm exams mustbe taken in a secure, proctored setting.

Required Textbook

Cacioppo/Freberg's Discovering Psychology: The Science of Mind

  • Authors: Cacioppo, John
  • Edition: 2nd
  • ISBN-10: 1-305-50890-4
  • ISBN-13: 978-1-305-50890-3

Schools may also purchase a physical student textbook via ohiostate.bncollege.com.

Social Work

Prerequisite High School Coursework
  • 3 Units of English Language Arts

Social Work 1130 - Introduction to Social Work in Contemporary Society

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introductory understanding of the profession of social work.  The course will examine the underlying assumptions, core values, fundamental goals, unique functions, and methods of social work in traditional social work settings. Social work’s response to major social problems such as poverty, mental health, substance abuse, crime and violence, aging, child welfare, crisis and trauma, and health care will be explored. The impacts of social stratification and stigmatization, as evidenced through racism, sexism, ageism, classism and heterosexism, contribute to the understanding of these social problems and are a critical part of this course.

Social Work 1130 satisfies the Social Science-Individuals and Groups area of the General Education Curriculum (GEC).

Required Textbook

An Introduction to the Profession of Social Work: Becoming a Change Agent

  • Authors: Segal, E.A., Gerdes, K.E. & Steiner, S.
  • Edition: 5th
  • Publisher: Boston, MA: Cengage Learning

Statistics

Prerequisite High School Coursework
  • Math 1116 (116) or 1130 (130) or above, or Math Placement Level L or M (students will not be able to take the math placement test until they are admitted to the Academy program - information about placement testing will be sent to the student once admitted), or permission of instructor

Statistics 1450 - Introduction to the Practice of Statistics

Statistics is the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. Because of global interest in Analytics and Data-driven Decision Making, universities are now  expecting graduates to have completed at least one Statistics course.

Why Take This Course

Statistics 1450 fulfills the General Education in Data Analysis requirement for The Ohio State University and is part of the Ohio Transfer Articulation Guidelines. The course’s curricular robustness from Descriptive Statistics thru Inference for Two Populations makes it widely accepted by higher education institutions across the country. This course has aptly prepared college students for undergraduate research opportunities.

Course Requirements

This course requires electronic access to the accompanying web-based materials (LaunchPad). The ebook, quizzes, and homework assignments are all located within this resource. LaunchPad access is valid for one year and costs $90+. See Required Textbook below for more information.

Required Textbook

The Basic Practice of Statistics

  • Authors: Moore, Notz, Fligner
  • Edition: 7th
  • ISBN: 9781319019341

This course requires electronic access to LaunchPad which includes the ebook, quizzes, and homework assignments. Follow these steps to access LaunchPad:

  1. Go to The Best Practice of Statistics on LaunchPad
  2. Bookmark the page to make it easy to return to
  3. Enroll in the course using one of the following options:
  • If you have an access code, select "I have a student access code", enter the code exactly as it appears on the card, and click Submit.
  • If you don't have an access code, either purchase a text package that includes one OR click "I want to purchase access" and follow the instructions.
  • If you need to start working but can't purchase right away, select "I want temporary access" and follow the instructions.